DAY 55. 1 JULY 2016. TAPIA DE CASARIEGO TO VILELA.

 Step by step

Step by step

We pack up and lock the albergue door behind us. Paul and Meg stop for coffee in town. It's a cool cloudy day- just right for walking. I've decided to follow the main Camino route rather than the coast path because of the mist and I soon bump into the Scottish couple. They had a comfortable €40 bug-free night and got their washing washed and ironed! We have a long conversation about the Referendum and its ramifications; they like me are pretty depressed about the whole thing. As I leave town I see a sign telling me it's 229km (142mikes) to Santiago.

 A walk on the beach

A walk on the beach

We come to a nice sandy beach and I peel off to walk on the sand and then climb up a steep stairway to rejoin the Camino. There's a bar at the top of the steps and I decide to stop for coffee; there's Paul! We have a chat and he leaves before me; I probably won't see him again as he is planning a long walk today.

Figuares is the last town in the district of Asturias. I try to find a couple of local tourist sites, but just end up getting lost and find the shipyard instead, I have to ask several times for directions to el puente. The Riba de Ribadeo is a massive estuary spanned by a long bridge.

Ribadeo is a buzzy Galician city; I stop to have a tea in a health-food shop with a bar. They are playing local Celtic folk-music and I feel I'm going to enjoy Galicia! I rest for an hour to edit my photos and catch up with writing my blog. I decide to walk a bit further today and head for the next albergue at Vilela.

 From Asturias to Galicia

From Asturias to Galicia

It's a 6km rural walk uphill, but it's lovely to be back in the woods and hills after days of coastal plain. I won't see the sea again until I reach the end of my journey.

 My Camino mates.  

My Camino mates.  

The albergue is simple but nice. Clean and newly converted. The Scottish couple have already arrived and settled in. There's a bar next door which serves a Menu del Dia and breakfast, but there's nothing else here except grass and trees.

 My home for tonight

My home for tonight

I have a shower and decide to wash everything I can and discover a.... bedbug in my sleeping bag-liner! Yikes. That means I've got to head for an albergue with a washer and dryer. Apparently 10 minutes in a hot tumble drier kills the ******s. I hope it was dead anyway? Luckily this albergue supplies paper sheets and pillow case so I can keep my sleeping-bag packed away.

I'm in the bar writing when a trio of young Germans come in and ask to stay in the albergue for nothing. The barmaid is cross (it's a donativo of €5/£4.20 each) and she tells them to walk on. Quite rightly I think.

One thing I dislike about Spanish bars is that the TV- sometimes 2 or 3 are always on. Usually it's pop videos or football- here it's non-stop war films. Luckily my Spanish is so bad I can't understand them, but the suspense music gets wearing!